Lots of updates … and I only took 2 weeks away from posting! 

Omnipod Insulin Management Systems … in the news:

Omnipod® Insulin Management System Now the Preferred Insulin Pump in British Columbia, Canada, 3 July 2018.  Read more: Omnipod: Preferred Insulin Pump in British Columbia, Canada
 

Insulet Reports Second Quarter 2018 Revenue of $124.3 Million, Up 13% Year-Over-Year, and Gross Margin of 66%, Up 710 Basis Points, 2 August 2018. Read more: Insulet Reports Second Quarter 2018 Revenue of $124.3 Million

Insulet Partners with the International Diabetes Federation Europe to Support Advocacy Activities Across the Continent, 9 July 2018. Read more: Insulet Partners with the International Diabetes Federation Europe to Support Advocacy Activities

Abbott’s FreeStyle® Libre 14 Day Flash Glucose Monitoring System Approved in U.S., 27 July 2018. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Allows users to wear the sensor for up to 14 days with high accuracy.
  • FreeStyle Libre14 day is now the longest-lasting self-applied continuous glucose sensing technology available.
  • FreeStyle Libre is now being used by more than 800,000 people with diabetes worldwide and is the world’s #1 CGM system.

Read more: Abbott’s Libre 14 Day Flash Glucose Monitoring System Now Approved in U.S.

 

Can a Rare Gene Recharge the Immune System and Cure Type 1 Diabetes? was discussed on ASweetLife.org, July 2018.

Last summer we ran a story called, Has A British Man Really Been Cured of Type 1 Diabetes?, about Dan Darkes (aka Miracle Dan) who claims to have had Type 1 diabetes for seven years before being cured. When Elizabeth Rowley interviewed Dan, for ASweetLife, he told her the realized he might have been ‘cured’ after experiencing low blood sugars while taking insulin. “I was going low a lot, waking up hypo in the night,” he said, “Eventually, after blood tests, including ones that showed my HbA1C was lowering, and getting lower, I was told by my doctors to reduce my insulin intake. I was eventually told to come off it completely.”

Darkes was certain he hadn’t been misdiagnosed as having Type 1 diabetes.  He said, “I definitely had Type 1 diabetes. I have gotten many comments online that I was just misdiagnosed and it was Type 2 diabetes, but I was on Novorapid and Lantus for 7 years – taking 15 units in morning, 12 units at lunch and then another evening dose. I do not think I was misdiagnosed. I know what I had.”

In attempt to understand what had happened in his body, Darkes traveled to the U.S. last year for tests.

Read more:

 

Metronom Health: Creating a New and Improved CGM, also from ASweetLife.org, July 2018.

Continuous glucose monitors are technological miracles that significantly improve care for people with diabetes. They can also be clunky, expensive, inconvenient to use.

One company has plans to change that, and make CGMs more popular by making them more cheaply, user-friendly, and reliable.

 “It should be affordable, comfortable, scalable, and very easy to use,” says Michele Lussier, the CEO of Metronom Health, a private company based in Belgium and the United States that is working to make a better CGM. “It should prompt you to recalibrate it, for instance. It should have a soft sensor and should be a soft, flexible device.”

Like other CGMs, Metronom’s CGM contains an enzyme that senses a person’s glucose and, in reaction to that level, produces hydrogen peroxide. Unlike other commercially available CGMs, a second enzyme then changes the peroxide into oxygen and water. The device senses this remaining oxygen to then produce a glucose reading. The added sensing capability of Metronom’s CGM is the ability to sense oxygen directly in separate locations to measure low, medium and high glucose levels compared to an oxygen reference. This theoretically means it’s more accurate because, often in other CGMs, compression of the actual sensor can be read as a drop in glucose levels, which can’t happen in Metronom’s sensor.

Additionally, Metronom’s CGM uses opto-enzymatic detection of glucose that measures the oxygen, produces light, and measures the decay of that light to produce a glucose level read out. This is radically different than other CGMs that use electrochemical sensors, which can be more prone to faulty readings.

Read more: Metronom Health: Creating a New and Improved CGM

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