Well, that’s quite the pitch … but you will not find a recommendation here about what you should eat or not eat.  And quite frankly, it can all be pretty confusing and frustrating.  There are lots of ways of approaching the topics of your gut biome (or microbiome) and food.  Here’s my best try to share what is going on regarding gut research and then foods.  After reading all the way through, and following all the references, please share with me/us any concerns, amusements or opinions.  Knowledge is good … helps us make our very best informed decisions, maybe! 

Let’s talk about the gut first.

Here’s a short TED-Ed video to get the discussion rolling …

On the technical side, a study published in the Journal of Immunology, 15 January 2017, titled The Influence of the Microbiome on Type 1 Diabetes details a study reviewing the links between changes in the gut microbiome and pancreatic autoimmunity.  Read more: The Influence of the Microbiome on Type 1 Diabetes

Joslin Diabetes Center posted, on 7 March 2017, Gut Feeling: How the Microbiome Could Affect Type 1 Diabetes.  Aleksandar D. Kostic, Ph.D., is studying how the communities of bacteria that line our digestive systems, also known as the microbiome, could start a chain reaction that leads to autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes.  “The gut is the largest immune organ in the body,” says Dr. Kostic. “It plays an important role in distinguishing self from non-self, distinguishing all of our symbiotic bacteria from pathogens and food antigens and [many other] exposures.” These things develop the immune system by helping it to learn what to fight and what to leave alone.     Read more: Gut Feeling: How the Microbiome Could Affect Type 1 Diabetes

According to Dr. Gabe Mirkin in his Fitness & Health Newsletter, 11 June 2017, Gut Bacteria Linked to Diabetes, recent research shows type II diabetes is linked to gut bacteria that invade the inner lining of the colon, while the dominant bacteria of most non-diabetics do not try to invade the inner lining of their colon (Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, June 2017). And there’s every reason to believe that this applies to those with Type 1 diabetes, along with many other autoimmune diseases.  Read more: Gut Bacteria Linked to Diabetes

Published on 19 January 2017 in the Journal of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Duodenal Mucosa of Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Shows Distinctive Inflammatory Profile and Microbiota. The study showed that duodenal mucosa in T1D presents disease-specific abnormalities in the inflammatory profile and microbiota. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these features is critical to disentangle the complex pathogenesis of T1D and to gain new perspectives for future therapies targeting the intestine. Read more: Duodenal Mucosa of Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Shows Distinctive Inflammatory Profile and Microbiota

And one more, published in Science Magazine, 11 August 2017, Gut cell metabolism shapes the microbiome, summarizes that gut microbes are key partners in host defense against potential pathogens. This might be achieved through cross-talk between gut bacteria, epithelial cells lining the gut (colonocytes), and immune cellsRead summary: Gut cell metabolism shapes the microbiome

OK, got it!  The gut microbiome is WAY important for those of us living with diabetes.  Now what?  What should we eat?  Which diet should we follow?  Does it matter?

Watch for my next post on What to Eat, Maybe?! 

 

 

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