Hi, My name is Cody, I’m a Tuxedo Cat who has T1D.

In a world where type 2 is more prevalent, and where people demand a lot of attention, a little T1D cat, like me, is often left out of all the JDRF activities and other T1D group meetings. So I’m incredibly honored to have been allowed to share a little about my life in such a distinguished blog as this one.

I was abandoned at age 2 and wandered the streets of Redondo Beach where my new fur-ever parents rescued me. I was healthy and strong and prided myself on being able to escape them by outrunning them and jumping up to the top of cabinets. I loved my new life and my new home.

But then one day my Mom noticed I was drinking a lot of water. She has Type 1 diabetes, and suspected I might have it, too.

In short order I was diagnosed as having both Type 1 diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); a lot of us diabetics have problems with our gut. Mom told me “only the sweetest of all beings become Type 1 diabetic and that she would always be here for me. She’s the Best of Moms; she truly loves me.

When it comes to giving shots, Dad is the can-do guy. Mom has been taking insulin shots or insulin via the pump for over 53 years, yet she can’t even watch me get a shot! Geez!

My medical regime begins at 5:30 AM. Mom gives me my Cisapride, a liquid medicine, and my Pepcid AC. This helps me digest my food. So okay…I’m up…I’m hungry…but they make me wait until 6:00 before I get any food and insulin.

Mom says that when she was little she had to wake up, go to the bathroom and then go again in another 1/2 hour to test her urine for BS. She tells me it was just as hard for her back then as it is for me now.

I have to eat slowly because of my IBD. I love being brushed and snuggled in between bites. I have to eat prescription food and an exact amount to match my insulin. I want to graze…I want to eat what I want when I want. But no, they are forever vigilant about this regime with my meds and my special food. They even make my little sister Charlotte eat the same cat food in case I sneak a bite of hers.

And being as we all must break the rules sometimes, I do sneak some of her food, even when I have more in my own bowl. I just want to be able to save it and eat it when I want to. After breakfast I get more liquid medicine and another pill.

I go through this regime twice a day, at breakfast and again for dinner; much like Mom did when she first became T1d.

Sometimes I feel like I have my own medical career going on here. You know what I mean? When Mom and Dad go out to dinner or to a diabetes conference and have to leave Charlotte and me at home, incredible cat-caregivers take care of me. My Aunt Gayle (Mom’s T1D “sister”) and my Uncle Glen come over to take care of me. Unlike Mom, Aunt Gayle is great at giving shots. But not just food and medicines—Aunt Gayle and the other cat-caregivers she referred to us, will brush me, talk to me and play with me.

I’m spreading the word about Type 1 diabetes in hopes that folks will be on the watch for other diabetic cats like me. Hey, it’s the best I can do because you guys don’t invite us cat T1D’s to your conferences. In fact, I get most of my information about cats with diabetes on the internet. I’m about 11 years old now. I’m way over due for my Gold Medal from the Joslin Clinic! If I was a human, considering I’m 77 years old in human years, I would have one!

But you know, my life is still good even though diabetes is a big part of it. The best things for me are snuggling with my loving Mom and Dad, chasing balls, playing with my Princess Sister, scratching posts and knowing that other Type 1’s got me well covered. Plus now, I’m a part of this great blog community; that means I’m a part of a group that best understands this disease that we all try to conquer every day.

With heartfelt purrs…Your T1D Mascot,
Cody =^^=

Thank you, Priscilla Faubel, for transcribing and sharing your story and life about Cody, your beautiful Tuxedo cat with Type 1 diabetes.  I must say, he is QUITE eloquent and honest with his feelings! 

 

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